Get up-to-date on vaccinations in light of National Immunization Awareness Month

fire extinguisher safety

August is National Immunization Awareness Month, an annual observance in the United States sponsored by the National Public Health Information Coalition. The goal is to increase awareness about the importance of immunizations at every stage of life. Vaccines are the easiest defense in helping prevent the spread of disease and infection.

Many recent outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases in the United States including whooping cough, measles, and mumps, are due to parents who have unvaccinated children. When vaccination rates drop in communities, it is common for an outbreak to occur (CDC, 8/15/16). It is crucial to educate yourself and family with the facts about vaccines to assure safety from vaccine-preventable diseases.

August is a great time to get up-to-date on vaccinations as the summer season comes to an end and before the flu season begins; it is also an opportunity to discuss with your health care provider about other recommended vaccines you and your family members might need. Choose to protect your family and community from the spread of disease by getting vaccinated.

Find out which vaccinations you need here: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/downloads/adult/adult-schedule-easy-read.pdf

Most common vaccines everyone needs:

• Influenza (every year for seasonal flu protection)
• Tdap: Tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), and diphtheria
• MMR or MMRV: Measles, mumps, varicella (chickenpox), rubella (at least one dose)
• HPV is strongly recommended for young girls and boys ages 11 or 12 to help prevent cancers caused by HPV later in life (series of 3 doses). Young women can get the vaccine through age 26, and young men through age 21.
• Other vaccines you may need will depend on factors including age, lifestyle, health condition, job, and any other vaccines you have had in the past

Importance of vaccination maintenance:

• Vaccinations have an expiration date; they wear off as you get older and your body may not have the same level of resistance against the same viruses and bacteria as it once did.
• Age and lifestyle changes. The risk for disease may increase as we get older due to health conditions, hobbies, travel, job etc.
• Vaccines are especially important for individuals with chronic conditions.

Succeed Management Solutions, LLC offers a variety of safety documents related to health and wellness including: Influenza Virus – Preventing the Spread, Whooping Cough, Infections – Viral Hepatitis, Zika Virus, and more.

Memorial Day Brings a Higher Rate of Crashes for Teens

texting while driving

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, in the 100 days after Memorial Day, about 1,000 Americans will die in crashes with teenage drivers behind the wheel, based on data from the last five years. More teens are on the road, increasing the overall average number of deaths by 16% during the summer months. Based on past studies, nearly 60% of these crashes will likely be the result of distracted driving, such as talking on cell phones and texting (USA Today Article 6/1/16).

It is important for teens to stay hands-free behind the wheel. On average, a driver is four times more likely to be in an accident when using an electronic device. All drivers (and teens, especially) should regularly review accident prevention and response procedures. Doing so can lessen the chance that a driver will get into an accident, and also prepare them to respond safely should an accident occur.

5 Tips to minimize the chance of an accident:

• Eliminate distractions
• Pull over if it cannot wait: If you must make a call, text, or email, pull the vehicle over to a safe location, off of the road, before doing so.
• Have someone else make calls: If a passenger is present, allow them to make and answer calls for you.
• Driving at night: Monitor speed to assure that your required braking distance does not exceed the range of the headlights.
• Be considerate: Avoid aggressive driving and practice defensive driving tactics by being mindful of pedestrians, monitoring your following distance, and being in a healthy state of mind.

Succeed Management Solutions, LLC offers toolbox talk resources on a variety of driver safety related topics such as: Accident Prevention, Accident Response, Electronic Devices, Driving at Night, an Emergency Supplies checklist and more.

Use the Safety Pyramid to Encourage Accountability

fire extinguisher safety

Ignoring the root causes of incidents that occur within your workplace can lead to serious injuries or even fatalities, sooner if not later. Addressing the underlying issues within your organization is essential to preventing OSHA-recordable incidents and saving lives!

Although less severe incidents occur more often, they are the ones that typically go completely undocumented. According to the Safety Pyramid, for every ten thousand unsafe behaviors and hazards that are observed, there will likely be one serious injury or fatality.

The Safety Pyramid compares the frequency of different types of incidents, ranging in severity from generally unsafe behaviors and hazards, to incidents that end in serious injuries or fatalities. While you may not want to spend the time and effort to officially document minor incidents, it is these recurring near misses and unsafe behaviors that reveal the internal problems within the organization. If they go uncorrected, they will eventually lead to more serious incidents. Don’t neglect minor incidents or deem them as insignificant.

Make it a habit to observe, investigate, and document each incident thoroughly – no matter how minor. The Safety Pyramid is a reference tool that can help to encourage an effective safety culture within your organization and promote accountability throughout the workplace.

Watch a video on the safety pyramid:


Electrical Installations – Safety & Execution

fire extinguisher safety

For temporary and/or permanent electrical equipment used on the job site:

Lock out/tag out procedures must be followed:

  • If systems need to be energized for work, only properly trained, licensed and qualified persons may work on these systems and only with proper controls in place.
  • Qualified persons must don the appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) as specified in the specific procedure for that equipment.
  • Extension cords are not to be used in lieu of permanent wiring. Extension cords used with portable electrical tools and appliances shall be of three-wire types.
  • Grounds are never to be removed from equipment or extension cords.

Tool and equipment condition:

  • All wiring and electrical equipment, tools and machinery shall be in excellent repair and part of a sound Preventive Maintenance Program with frequent inspections and full documentation.

Temporary lights:

  • Temporary lights and lighting where exposed to breakage, shall be equipped with guards to prevent accidental contact with the bulb.
  • Temporary lights shall not be suspended by their electric cords unless cords and lights are designed for this means of suspension.
  • Splices are not permitted.

Electrical lines, extension cords, and cables:

  • Do not to lay them on floors or in walkways, etc.
  • Secure and place in doorways and work areas so they won’t be damaged.
  • Do not use flexible cords as a substitute for fixed wiring, run flexible cords through walls, ceilings, floors, doorways, windows, attach to building surfaces, or conceal behind building walls, ceilings, or floors.

Panel boards, access, and ground fault systems:

  • These must have dead fronts on them at all times, except when being serviced.
  • All electrical equipment should have at least a three foot clearance in front of the equipment.
  • The area needs to be controlled for unauthorized access.
  • A “ground fault system” is used to prevent shock hazards. This may include the use of “ground fault circuit interrupters” (GFCIs) or an “assured equipment grounding program”.

Fire Extinguisher Safety

fire extinguisher safety

Have you inspected your fire extinguishers lately?

Are they fully charged, strategically located, accessible, and ready for use? Or, are they covered with dust and hidden in a corner where they create a false sense of security?

Fire extinguishers are often purchased with enthusiasm and then forgotten because they are not needed. It is a good thing that they have not been needed, but they still need proper inspection and maintenance. Not only is this a legal requirement, but ensures they are ready to use if needed! Remember, fire extinguishers are a first line of defense against fire.

Fire extinguishers must be kept accessible and functional to eliminate lost time when they are needed. Inspect your extinguishers monthly to be certain they are charged and in ready to use condition. Annual maintenance inspections are required in accordance with NFPA 10. Other maintenance and inspection requirements are required based on the type of extinguisher. Check the manufacturer owner’s manual for these requirements.

Also, if staff will be expected to use fire extinguishers in an emergency, be sure that they have received training on how to use them correctly.

Do you have the proper Class of extinguisher for the kinds of materials that are most likely to burn in your operation?

The following is a list of the different classes of fires and the recommended fire extinguishers to be used for each. The correlation is very straightforward: Class A fires require Class A extinguishers; Class B fires require Class B extinguishers, etc. Some extinguishers have multiple ratings which makes them usable on different classes of fires. But remember, if you do not know what kind of materials are burning or if you do not have the proper class of extinguisher, do not try to fight the fire; evacuate immediately.

  • Class A Fires involve ordinary combustibles such as paper, plastic, rags, and wood. The recommended extinguishers are Class A.
  • Class B Fires involve flammable liquids such as oil, grease, gasoline, and paint. The recommended extinguishers are Class B.
  • Class C Fires involve electrical equipment such as motors, heaters, and office machines. The recommended extinguishers are Class C.
  • Class D Fires involve combustible metals such as magnesium, aluminum, sodium, and potassium. The recommended extinguishers are Class D.
  • Class K Fires involve combustible cooking fluids such as oils and fats. The recommended extinguishers are Class K.